The Art of Storytelling in Supervision

Total hours: 6 hour workshop: 10:00 AM- 5:00 PM

Date: October 16, 2011
Institute of Transpersonal Psychology
Contact: Lisa Herman:[email protected].

Institute of Transpersonal Psychology
1069 East Meadow Circle Palo Alto, CA 94303
[ph] 650.493.4430 • [fx] 650.493.6835

Presenters:
Kate T. Donohue, Ph.D. REAT
Linda Hammond MFT RDT REAT

Course Overview:

This 6 hour workshop will focus on how the story enhances the supervision by utilizing the creative process. Story in the supervisory process emphasizes the universality of each person’s experience as well as inviting creative play by following the images and imaginative processes of the psyche.

  • Images of fairy tales, myths and folktales stimulate hope
  • Story narratives and images have the power to give supervisors, supervisees and their clients the sense that their problems are not irresolvable and they are not alone with their own unique life issues.
  • Stories enhance the feeling of connection to the larger collective whole,
  • Stories also serve as transitional objects.

Through didactic theoretical presentation, case studies, and experiential processes, participants will learn to clinically use Jungian oriented Expressive Arts Therapy with a focus on the use of story to address issues in supervision.

Course Description:

Story in the supervisory process makes use of the images and imaginative processes of the psyche. Images of fairy tales, myths and folktales stimulate hope and have the power to give supervisors, supervisees and their clients the sense that their problems are not irresolvable and they are not alone with their own unique life issues. Stories enhance the feeling of connection to the larger collective whole. Stories also serve as transitional objects.

In this class we will study the healing teaching nature of story and its uses in the supervisory relationship to promote creative and successful clinical work. Stories will be explored in many expressive arts modalities using visual arts, movement and drama. Workshop participants will have a chance to share and engage with their most significant stories and have a storytelling experience. In group and dyadic formats students will experiment with how the images that are activated in the therapist and supervisor’s psyche can be translated into a fairytale, myth, folktale or teaching story to be used as a focus in the therapeutic relationship. We will engage with how the triad of client and therapist material stimulates an internal story for the supervisory either an actual fairytale/legend etc. or another image, that could be translated into a story. This image is worked with internally by the supervisor and given back to the supervisee as a means for understanding the client and the transference/countertransference intersubjective issues in the relationship.

Purpose and Benefits of the Course:

This course is designed to fulfill the Continuing Education Supervisor requirements of the BBS. The material in this course will be applicable to group and individual supervision.

  • In this workshop we will study the healing teaching nature of story and its uses in the supervisory relationship to promote creative and successful clinical work.
  • We will engage ideas of how story is a player in the transference/countertransference, cotransference and intersubjecive field of the client, therapist supervisor triad.
  • In group and dyadic formats students will experiment with how the images that are activated in the therapist and supervisor’s psyche can be translated into a fairytale, myth, folktale or teaching story to be used as a focus in the therapeutic relationship.
  • Workshop participants will have a chance to share and engage with their most significant stories and have a storytelling experience
  • Participants will gain a deeper and more expansive grasp of of uses of Intermodal Expressive Arts and learn to apply them in the supervisory setting. We will explore stories using intermodal expressive arts, an integration visual arts, movement , drama and music.

General Learning Objectives:

Participants will deepen their understanding of these ideas and their applications to their supervisory practice:

  1. Presenting a Jungian theoretical framework of Storytelling
  2. Learning Intermodal Expressive Arts Therapy processes geared towards uses in Supervision
  3. Learn to listen with an ear to emerging story
  4. Develop ease with simple storytelling
  5. Attend to primacy of image and metaphor in Supervision relationship
  6. Learn how to apply these ideas and processes to their supervisory practice.

References for Storytelling in Therapy
References for Creative Supervision
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Recommended Readings on Story Telling in Therapy:

Alston, T. (1995) Exploring Feelings Through Storyimaging Storytelling

Buber, M. (1975). Tales of Hasidim: Book One: The Early Masters. NY: Schoeken Books.

Franzke, E. (1989). Fairy Tales in Psychotherapy: The Creative Use of Old and New Tales. Lewiston NY:Hans Huber.

Gersie, A. (1992). Earth Tales: Storytelling in Times of Change London: The Merlin Press.

(1997). Reflections on Therapeutic Storymaking: The Use of Stories in Groups. London: Jessica L. Kingsley. Compact Disk

(1991). Storymaking and Bereavement: Dragons Fight in the Meadow. London: Jessica L. Kingsley.

(1990). Storymaking in Education and Therapy. London: Jessica L. Kingsley.

Beck, R. (1990). The Art of Ritual: A Guide to Creating & Performing Your Own Ceremonies for Growth & Change. Berkeley – CA: Celestial Arts.

Bettelheim, B. (1989). The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. New York: Vintage.

Brett, D. (1986). Annie Stories. NY: Workman Publishing.

Brun, B. & Pedersen & Runberg – editors (1993) Symbols of the Soul: Therapy and Guidance Through Fairy Tales. London/Philadelphia: Jessica L. Kingsley.

Coates, C. (Jan/Feb1990) Common Boundary - “Once Upon a Session: Healing Stories and the Reenchantment of Psychotherapy”

Crimmens, P. (1998) Storymaking and Creative Groupwork with Old People. London/Bristol PA: Jessica L. Kingsley.

Dicke, P. (1998). Complementary/Alternative Therapies in Nursing 3rd edition-Storytelling. NY: Springer.

Dieckmann, H. (1986). Twice Told Tales: The Psychological Uses of Fairy Tales. IL: Chiron Publications.

Dwivedi, K. N. (ED)(1997). The Therapeutic Use of Stories London: Routledge.

Epston, D. (1990). Narrative Means to Therapeutic Ends. NY: Norton.

Estes, C. P. PhD. (1992) Women Who Run With The Wolves. NY: Ballantine.

Feinstein, D. (1988). Personal Mythology: The Psychology of Your Evolving Self. Los Angeles: Tarcher.

Frank, A. W. (1995). The Wounded Storyteller: Body & Illness and Ethics. IL: The University of Chicago Press.

Franks, B. (1991). Fairy Tales and Dance/Movement Therapy: Catalysts of Change for Eating-Disordered Individuals. The Arts in Psychotherapy - Vol 18: 311-319.

Friedman, E. H. (1990). Friedman’s Fables. NY: Guilford Press.

Grolnick, S. (1986). Fairy Tales and Psychotherapy: Fairy Tales and Society” Illusion & Allusion and Paradigm. University of Pennsylvania Press

Gordon, D. (1978). Therapeutic Metaphors: Helping Others Through the Looking Glass. Cupertino CA: META Publishers.

Haley, J. (1986). Uncommon Therapy. NY: W. W. Norton.

Julius E. (1974). A Psychiatric Study of Myths and Fairytales: Their Origin & Meaning & Usefulness. Springfield IL: Charles Thomas.

Hillman, J. (1975) The Dream and the Underworld. NY: Harper & Row.

Kaminsky, M. (1984). The Uses of Reminiscence: New Ways of Working with Older Adults. NY: Haworth Press.

Kast, V. (1995). Folktales as Therapy. UK: Fromm International Publishing Corp.

Keen, S. & Valley-Fox, A. (1989) Your Mythic Journey: Finding Meaning in Your Life through Writing and Storytelling. NY: G. P. Putnam’s Sons.

Kopp, S. (1972). If You Meet the Buddha on the Road - Kill Him.
NY: Bantam/New Age.

Kuttner, L. (1987). Favorite Stories: A Hypnotic Pain-reduction Technique for Children in Acute Pain. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis pp194-200.

Larkin, D. (1988) Therapeutic Storytelling and Metaphors. Holistic Nursing Practice. Pp45-53.

Lawlis, F. G. PhD (1995). Storytelling as Therapy: Implications for Medicine.Alternative Therapies Vol. 1 - No. 2 pp.40-45.

Livo, N. J. (2001). Story Medicine: Multicultural Tales of Healing and Transformation. Englewood, Co: Libraries Unlimited Greenwood Publishing.

Miller, M. (1998). Psychology as Storytelling. International Journal of Personal Construct Psychology. - 1 pp125-137.

Meade, E. H. (1995). Tell It by Heart: Women and the Healing Power of Story. Chicago:Open Court.

Mellon, N. (2001). Storytelling with Children. NY: Hawthorn Press

Mills, J. C. & Crowley, R. J. (1986). Therapeutic Metaphors for Children and The Child Within. N Y: Bruner/Mazel.

Noonan, W. (1992). Healing Tales: The Metaphors of Folktales Help Cancer Patients in their Therapy. Creation Spirituality pp 28-30.

Parkinson, R. (2009). Transforming Tale: How Stories Can Change People.London: Jessica Kingsley Press.

Peseschkian, N. (1982). Oriental Tales as Tools in Psychotherapy: The Merchant and the Parrot. Berlin:Springer-Verlag.

Stallings, F. (1988). The Web of Silence: the Story-listening Trance. TheNational Storytelling Journal. Spring/Summer.

Stone, R. (1996). The Healing Art of Storytelling: A Sacred Journey of Personal Discovery. NY: Hyperion.

Taylor, D. PhD (1996). The Healing Power of Stories: Creating yourself through the stories of your life. NY: Doubleday.

Von Franz, M.L. (1972) The Feminine in Fairy Tales. Dallas: Spring Publications
(1970). The Interpretation of Fairy Tales. Dallas: Spring Publications.

(1980). The Psychological Meaning of Redemption Motifs in FairytalesCanada: Inner City Books.

(1974). Shadow and Evil in Fairytales. Zurich, Switzerland: Spring Publications.

(1972). Creation Myths. Boston, MA: Shambala Press.

Wallas, L. (1985). Stories for the Third Ear. NY:Norton.

Whitaker, Linda (1992). Healing the Mother/Daughter Relationship Through the Therapeutic Use of Fairy Tales & Poetry and Stories: Journal of Poetry Therapy - Vol. 6 No.1.

Wolkstein, D. (1971) Old and New Sexual Messages in Fairytales. Wilson Library Bulletine: New York, NY: Vol 46 Number 2.

(1991) The First Love Stories. New York: Harper Perennial.

Wolkstein, D. and Kramer, S. N. (1983). Innana: Queen of Heaven and Earth.New York: Harper and Row.

Zimmer, H. (1988). King and the Corpse. London: Jessica Kingsley Press.

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Creative Supervision References:

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Alonso, A. (1985). The Quiet Profession: Supervisors of Psychotherapy. New York: Macmillan.

Bernard, J.M. & Goodyear, R.K. (1992). Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Borders, L.D., & Usher, C.H. (1992). “Post-degree supervision: Existing and preferred practices”. Journal of Counseling and Development, 70,594-599.

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Caligor, L, Bromberg, P. and Meltzer, J. (1984). Clinical Perspectives on the Supervision of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy, New York: Plenum Press.

Chin, J.L., De La Canceia, V., and Jenkins, Y.M. (1993). Diversity in psychotherapy: The politics of race, ethnicity, and gender. Westport: Praeger.

Corkier, L.S. & Bernard, J.M. (1982). “ Ethical and legal responsibilities of Clinical Supervision.” The Personnel and Guidance Journal, 60,486-491.

Disney, M.J. and Stephens, A.M. (1994). “Legal issues in clinical supervision.” The ACA Legal Series, Vol. 10. Alexandria: American Counseling Association.

Hess, A.K., (1980). Psychotherapy Supervision: Theory, Research and
Practice, New York:. John Wiley & Sons.

Hess, A.K. (1986). Growth in supervision: Stages of supervisee and supervisor development. The Clinical Supervisor, 4(102), 51-67

Jemerson-Madden D. S., (1998) “Practical and Cultural Aspects of Supervision” in Supervision, A Manual by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, II-168-III76.

Kaiser, T.L., (1992). “Supervisory Relationships: An Identification of the Primary Elements in the Relationship and An Application of Two Theories of Ethical Relationships” Journal of Marital and Family Therapy. 18, 283-296.

Kaslow, N. J. (1993). “ A Developmental Approach to Psychotherapy Supervision of Interns and Postdoctoral Fellows” In The Psychotherapy Bulletin. 28(4), 20-22.

Kugler, P. (ed.) (1995). Jungian Perspectives on Clinical Supervision.Einsiedeln, Switzerland: Daimon Press.

Langs, R. (1979). The Supervisory Experience. New York: Jason Aronson.

Lahad, M. (2000). Creative Supervision. Philadelphia, Pa.: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Loganbill C., Hardy, E., & Delworth, U. (1982). Supervision: A conceptual model. The Counseling Psychologist, 10(1), 3-42.

McNiff, S (1986) “Supervision and Evaluation”. In Educating the Creative Arts Therapist, 7, 155-187, Springfield, Illinois, Charles C. Thomas.

Robbins, A. and Marilyn LaMonica (1986).”Creative Exploration of Countertransference Experiences” In Robbins, A. (1986) Expressive Therapy: Creative Arts Approach to Depth-Oriented Treatment. New York: Plenum Publishing.

Robbins, A. and Erismann, M. (1994). “Developing Therapeutic Artistry: A Joint Countertransference Supervisory Seminar/Stone Sculpting Workshop” In Robbins, A. (1994) A Multi-Modal Approach to Creative Art Therapy. Bristol, Pennsylvania: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Robbins, A. (1988) “A Psychoaesthetic Perspective on Creative Arts Therapy and Training” In The Arts in Psychotherapy Journal, 15(2), 95-100.

Tselikas-Portmann, E. (ed.) (1999). Supervision and Dramatherapy.Philadelphia, Pa.: Jessica Kingsley.

Stoltenburg, C.D. and Delworth, U. (1987). Supervising counselors and therapist: A development approach. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Watkins, C.E., Jr. (Ed.). (1997). Handbook of psychotherapy supervision.New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Williams, A. (1995). Visual and Active Supervision. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Worthington, E.L., Jr. (1987). “Changes in supervision as counselors and Supervisors gain experience: A review.” Professional Psychology, 18,189-208.